Scott Lipps Discusses the Importance of Influencers and How they are Shifting the Modelling Industry

Posted by Daniel Elmleh on August 26, 2016


Influicity caught up with Scott Lipps, the founder and CEO of One Management. The NYC-based modelling agency works with stars such as Nicky Minaj, A$AP Rocky, and Steve Aoki. In 2014, One Management launched its One.1K division, linking talented individuals to brands via social media. Today, they continue to assert themselves as an industry leader in digital media.

We talked to Scott about the industry’s evolution, what magazines must do to survive, and why he going all in on influencers.

 

Scott_Lipps_271-A

 

The following is an excerpt summary of an interview with Scott Lipps as told to Influicity:

 

One Management was founded in 2001. In what way has the modelling industry changed since you first started?

In this day and age, more modelling deals have become strictly digital. To help shift our focus on social media, we created our ONE.1k division to help merge social media with fashion. The digital space is a relatively new platform and still evolving. It’s still the wild west, where everyone is still trying to figure out their structure and engagement strategies.

 

Given your interest in influencer marketing, do you think scouting will start to happen more on social media platforms?

Right now we are really active on social media and scout organically. It’s more convenient to discover models on Instagram instead of travelling to Sweden, let’s say, and finding talent there. Right now, I would say about 5-10% of our talent stems from social media.

 

How important is it for models up and coming today, to have a strong social media audience?

It’s very important nowadays in this fast-paced environment and also goes into my last point. We have 2 schools of thought. First, there’s buying people that have a small following on Instagram, and building up their reputation through the ranks. Then there’s the people that have a massive following, which is more expensive for us but there’s a lot more reach.

 

What do traditional magazines need to do to compete with Instagram and Snapchat?

Right now it’s tough, but I think magazines should adopt a subscription based service similar to Spotify where, for example, if a customer pays $10 a month they have access to all the up-to-date content. It’s a big shift because this was never a factor a few years ago. Some models wouldn’t want to participate in any digital photo shoots and stick to magazines. Now that the digital space is becoming more of a norm, models are doing photo shoots for online space.

 

Where do you see the modelling industry in 10 years? Will it be fundamentally shifted by social media?

I think the modelling industry has already been shifted by social media and it’s continuing to evolve. Magazines are constructing their content more and more for digital sources and, in 10 years, I believe it’ll be more common. A lot of these viral stars you see on Instagram have attracted magazine publishers for photo shoots. We used to see only celebrities being sought out to be on the cover of Vogue, for example. Now these influencers have emerged and have slowly brought out a more competitive nature in the industry.

 

What advice would give today to someone trying to break into the modelling world?

It’s all about the hustle. The ones that hustle are the ones that do well. It’s like anything: if you’re hungry and want to succeed, you will succeed.